Farming With Trees: Three Dimensional Management for Multiple Outputs and Improved Livestock Production (SFIN)

18 October 2013 10:00 - 18 October 2013 13:30

Glensaugh Farm, Laurencekirk

Including trees in the overall management of a farm can have many benefits, whether you produce crops or livestock. An integrated approach to farm woodland can provide multiple outputs when managed as a multi-use area, and benefits can include more efficient natural resources management, more grass productivity, reduced animal feed costs, increased animal welfare, increased biodiversity, and biofuel/ timber crop production.

This will be a practical afternoon looking at how farm woodland can be managed as multi-use areas to provide multiple outputs; and the positive role trees can play in livestock production. Glensaugh Farm has done extensive research into the benefits of silvopastoral grazing systems, and trialled several woodland planting and management regimes. Merits and drawbacks of different management approaches, and current legislation/schemes for farm woodland will be among the topics discussed.

Speakers will include Stephen Briggs of Abacus Organic, Mike Strachan of Forestry Commission Scotland.

The event is free of charge to farmers and growers, and £40.00 plus VAT to others. Please note that places are limited as group size will be restricted, therefore booking is required.

Click here for a booking form.

For further information please call Colleen on 0131 666 2474 or email cmcculloch@soilassociation.org

This programme is supported by the SRDP Skills Development Scheme, Duchy Originals Future Farming Programme, Forestry Commission Scotland and Zero Waste Scotland.



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