CSA and Biodiversity Conference

12 September 2013 10:00 - 12 September 2013 16:00

River Bourne Community Farm, Cow Lane, Laverstock, Salisbury, Wiltshire. SP1 2SR

This one day conference will be fantastic for anyone who has already started a CSA project or those thinking about starting one up in the south west area.

There will be speakers from River Bourne Community Farm and another local project both sharing our experiences as well as organisations who support CSA's offering information on a variety of subjects, a chance to network over lunch and workshops in the afternoon.

Programme
  • 9.30am Registration & refreshments 
  • 10am   Welcome & start
  • 4pm          Close 
A light lunch will be provided. Please contact us if you have any food allergies.
 
 
River Bourne Community Farm is based on land adjacent to Cow Lane in the village of Laverstock, Salisbury. Initially on 63 acres of land adjoining the River Bourne, the farm has developed into a sustainable working farm, supported by staff and by volunteers.
 
The farm site was first occupied in January 2010 is managed by The River Bourne Community Farm C.I.C. (This is a 'Community Interest Company' designed specifically for those wishing to operate for the benefit of the community rather than for the benefit of the owners of the company).
 
The farm is actively supported by many local individuals and businesses both practically and financially along with other funding sources.
 
 



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