Flock Science Seminar

05 July 2013 10:00 - 05 July 2013 15:30

Oxpens Farm, Stowell Park Estate,  Northleach, Cheltenham GL54 3QE.

Following last year’s Flock Science Seminar, Oxpens Farm, Stowell Park Estate have kindly agreed to host a follow on event for us on Friday the 5th July 2013. The day will be quite comprehensive and include: presentations from our visiting speakers, practical demonstrations, research dissemination from our academics and students, along with a BBQ lamb lunch.

Provisional Programme:
 
10:00  Registration, Refreshments and Networking  
10:30  Welcome ~ Dr Rachael Foy, Lecturer School of Agriculture, RAU 
10:45  Efficiency gains from new Genetic Technologies ~  Speaker tbc 
11:15  Increasing output from Hill Farms and natural outdoor systems ~ Speaker tbc, Large Scale Hill Farmer, New Zealand 
11:45  Refreshments and Networking 
12:15  New forage options for lamb finishing and winter feeding ~  Bayden Wilson, Focus Genetics New Zealand 
12:45  Why we moved from high input/high out put system to lower input/output outdoor system, the change in  genetics and our goals ~ Mike Dewar, Farm Manager, Stowell Park Estate 
13:15  Lunch, Networking and Mini-Exhibition  
14:15  The FAI 5 Point Lameness plan ~ Ruth Clements MRCVS, Head of Veterinary Services, FAI 
14:35  Anthelmintic Resistance ~ Speaker tbc, Zoetis UK Ltd  
14:50  Monitoring emerging diseases such as Schmallenberg ~ Speaker tbc, Animal Health Veterinary Laboratories Agency
 
Attendance Fees:
 
Delegate price: £100.00           Farmers: FREE    Alumni and Students: FREE 
Registration is essential to secure your place 
 
For more information or to book your place please contact:
Royal Agricultural University, Cirencester, GL7 6JS 
Tel: 01285 652531 Ext 4045   E-mail: skillsprogramme@rau.ac.uk
 
This event is delivered through the Skills Programme which is part of the Rural Development Programme for England (RDPE)



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