How to grow organic fruit and vegetables

Get organic vegetable gardening and grow organic food

Growing your own organic food using organic gardening techniques is an individual action all of us can take to build a sustainable food culture. There are 300,000 acres of prime growing land in domestic gardens or allotments in the UK, with 80% of households having access to a garden. And even if you don't have a garden many popular fruits and vegetables will grow in pots or window boxes. At the moment though less than a third of gardens in this country are used to grow anything to eat.

Growing organic vegetables and fruit has many benefits. Because you can eat your harvest almost immediately your fruit and vegetables lose less nutrients, meaning they are healthier for you and your family. Food miles are non-existent, saving on the damaging greenhouse gas emissions associated with our modern food chains. With anything you don't need composted, waste is more or less eliminated. And by managing your garden using organic principles you can encourage bio-diversity, meaning you're helping improve your local environment.

If you've no experience, the thought of growing your own vegetables can be intimidating. To help get you started, organic gardener Phillipa Pearson has put together this month-by-month guide to key tasks on your veg plot. And Soil Association members can get regular advice in our membership magazine Living Earth.

Gardening blogs

A second green revolution?

Anna Louise Batchelor: Last month I attended a special lecture held at the University of Reading’s School of Agriculture. Entitled “Balancing food production and environmental protection” the speaker set out to overcome the thorny issue of increasing yields without increasing damage to eco-systems. The lecture was given by Poul Christensen, President of the National Federation of Young Farmers and former chair of Natural England.

30 March 2015 | 0 Comments | Recommended by 1

Putting planet and growers at the core of seed legislation

Concepta Cassar: The arrival of March marks the melting of winter into spring, and the long-awaited emergence of new life from the depths of the cold season. Snow drops, daffodils and crocuses bring light where there was once darkness, and the first-sown seeds of the year finally start to raise their sleepy heads. Around the country, people will be cracking open bean pods and shaking out little envelopes, while the seed industry celebrates an early cash crop.

10 March 2015 | 0 Comments | Recommended by 0

Child gardening

Gardening courses
Weed and pest control within the organic regime
04 April

Valerie's Veggies, Feliz Ginns Road, Stocking Pelham, Herts, SG9 0JD

Growing from seeds
11 April

Valerie's Veggies, Feliz Ginns Road, Stocking Pelham, Herts, SG9 0JD

Home grown food despite bizarre weather
18 April

Valerie's Veggies, Feliz Ginns Road, Stocking Pelham, Herts, SG9 0JD

Companion planting
25 April

Valerie's Veggies, Feliz Ginns Road, Stocking Pelham, Herts, SG9 0JD

Agroecology: food for the future
27 April

Schumacher College, The Old Postern, Dartington, Totnes, Devon, TQ9 6EA, UK